Day: May 2, 2020

How ‘Lock Her Up’ just blew up

The “her” is Hillary Clinton. The crime for which the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee should allegedly be imprisoned isn’t clear. But the chant has become a regular part of the circus-like atmosphere at Trump rallies, a sort of calling card for the movement.

Here’s something else that happened on Thursday night: The Trump Justice Department closed its 2-year long probe into Clinton’s business dealings — including whether the Clinton Foundation received special treatment during the former first lady’s time as Secretary of State under President Barack Obama. That includes an allegation made by Trump (and some other conservatives) that Clinton had somehow steered a uranium deal to the Russians after a donation to the Clinton Foundation.

That wasn’t true then. And now an investigation authorized by then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions to look into potential wrongdoing by Clinton has turned up a total of zero wrongdoing of any sort by either … Read More

A Guide to Disability Rights Laws

U.S. Department of Justice

Civil Rights Division
Disability Rights Section


February 2020

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Americans with Disabilities Act

Telecommunications Act

Fair Housing Act

Air Carrier Access Act

Voting Accessibility for the Elderly and Handicapped Act

National Voter Registration Act

Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

Rehabilitation Act

Architectural Barriers Act

General Sources of Disability Rights Information

Statute Citations

For persons with disabilities, this document is available in large print, Braille, and CD.

Reproduction of this document is encouraged.


This guide provides an overview of Federal civil rights laws that ensure equal opportunity for people with disabilities. To find out more about how these laws may apply to you, contact the agencies and organizations listed below.

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

The ADA prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, State and local government, public accommodations, commercial facilities, transportation,

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Federal Register :: Home – Friday, May 1st

This site displays a prototype of a “Web 2.0” version of the daily
Federal Register. It is not an official legal edition of the Federal
Register, and does not replace the official print version or the official
electronic version on GPO’s govinfo.gov.

The documents posted on this site are XML renditions of published Federal
Register documents. Each document posted on the site includes a link to the
corresponding official PDF file on govinfo.gov. This prototype edition of the
daily Federal Register on FederalRegister.gov will remain an unofficial
informational resource until the Administrative Committee of the Federal
Register (ACFR) issues a regulation granting it official legal status.
For complete information about, and access to, our official publications
and services, go to

About the Federal Register

on NARA’s archives.gov.

The OFR/GPO partnership is committed to presenting accurate and reliable
regulatory information on FederalRegister.gov with the objective of
establishing the XML-based Federal Register

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Congressional Cemetery Government Lots – National Cemetery Administration

Established in 1807, Congressional Cemetery is located in the southeast quadrant of Washington, D.C., overlooking the Anacostia River. The National Cemetery Administration has jurisdiction over 806 burial plots located throughout the larger cemetery, including some of the oldest and most significant historic resources maintained by the agency.

The original 4.5 acres of Congressional Cemetery was purchased by a group of Washingtonians for a private burial ground. On July 19, 1807, Uriah Tracy of Connecticut became the first congressman buried in the cemetery. In 1812 the group deeded the cemetery to Christ Church as The Washington Parish Burial Ground. Five years later, Christ Church set aside 100 burial lots for members of Congress who died in Washington. From this time forward, the nickname Congressional Cemetery has been used, although in 1849 the official name was changed to Washington Cemetery.

By the 1820s, Congressional Cemetery was the traditional burial site of senators,

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