Day: May 9, 2020

American Society for Ethnohistory

As ASE president and one of the conference organizers for the upcoming conference in Durham, I am writing to let you know that, due to COVID-19, we have decided to postpone the conference until Fall of 2021. While the specific dates are still to be determined, the conference will take place in the same hotel and will once again be sponsored by Duke University and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Those who have submitted proposed papers and panels for this year’s conference will receive a separate e-mail with more information. We look forward to welcoming you here for a great conference and to showcase for you the work that we are doing at our universities and in the community at large. But we must do so at a time of less uncertainty—when it is safe for everybody to travel and when you have travel funds to do so.

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Identification | Transportation Security Administration

Adult passengers 18 and over must show valid identification at the airport checkpoint in order to travel.

  • Driver’s licenses or other state photo identity cards issued by Department of Motor Vehicles (or equivalent)
  • U.S. passport
  • U.S. passport card
  • DHS trusted traveler cards (Global Entry, NEXUS, SENTRI, FAST)
  • U.S. Department of Defense ID, including IDs issued to dependents
  • Permanent resident card
  • Border crossing card
  • State-issued Enhanced Driver’s License
  • Federally recognized, tribal-issued photo ID
  • HSPD-12 PIV card
  • Foreign government-issued passport
  • Canadian provincial driver’s license or Indian and Northern Affairs Canada card
  • Transportation worker identification credential
  • U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Employment Authorization Card (I-766)
  • U.S. Merchant Mariner Credential

In coordination with its DHS counterparts, TSA has identified acceptable alternate identification for use in special circumstances at the checkpoint.

 

A weapon permit is not an acceptable form of identification. A temporary driver’s license is not an acceptable form of identification.

Exemptions

Learn about

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Government Contracts | Wex | US Law

Government Contracts Law: An Overview

The United States Government is the single largest procurer of goods and services in the world, and the Department of Defense (DOD) accounts for the lion’s share of federal acquisitions.  Three major characteristics distinguish Government acquisitions from private sector contracts.  First, Government contracts are subject to myriad statutes, regulations, and policies which encourage competition to the maximum extent practicable, ensure proper spending of taxpayer money, and advance socioeconomic goals.  Second, Government contracts contain mandatory clauses which afford the Government special contractual rights, including the right to unilaterally change contract terms and conditions or terminate the contract.  The most important clauses are the “Changes” clause, the “Termination for Convenience” clause, and the “Default” clause.  Third, due to the Government’s special status as a sovereign entity, claims and litigation follow the unique procedures of the Contract Disputes Act. 

Government contracts are subject to

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Latest Government Jobs 2020-21 Notification on 09.05.2020