Article about Goverment by The Free Dictionary

the highest executive body of a state. Sometimes called the council of ministers or cabinet of ministers, governments are headed by a prime minister, a chancellor, or by the chairman of the council of ministers or cabinet of ministers. In some countries the government is headed by the head of state—in the USA, for example, by the president. Such members of the government as ministers, secretaries, and secretaries of state direct state administrative departments. Governments may be composed of one or of several parties. Federal states have a central or federal government as well as governments of the political units, for example, states or provinces, that form the federation.

In capitalist countries governments are formed by a parliament or are appointed by the monarch or president. In the Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, and Japan the head of state appoints as premier or chancellor a person elected by parliament. In many countries the government according to law is responsible to parliament, but in reality all the power is generally wielded by the government and its head; this system of government by ministers has replaced parliamentarism. In capitalist countries, the government’s delegated legislative power is of great importance. Bourgeois governments are continually under the influence of large capitalist conglomerates, which determine the government’s composition and policies. Thus, the government becomes in actuality the political instrument of a small group of leading monopolists, who utilize the government to control society.

In socialist states the government is formed by the highest body of the people’s representatives, to which it is responsible and accountable. The governments of the socialist countries are the highest executive and administrative bodies of state authority. Their formation, composition, and scope are determined by constitutions or by constitutional laws.

in linguistics, a syntactic relationship between the parts of a sentence; the lexical and grammatical characteristics of one part (the governing part) determine the grammatical form of another part (the subordinate part). For example, a transitive verb requires an object in the accusative case without a preposition, as in “I see a friend.”

In the structure of a sentence, the relationship of government applies to the objects of nouns and is in contrast to the relationships of agreement and subordination. In verbal government the verb is the governing part, and in nominal government the verbal noun is the governing part.

In Russian, the subordinate part of a sentence governed by a transitive verb is in the accusative case without a preposition (direct object); the subordinate part of a sentence governed by an intransitive verb is in the genitive or another case (indirect object). There is a certain correlation between verbal and nominal government. When a verbal noun has been formed from a transitive verb, the accusative case of the direct object changes to the genitive case. For example, in the phrase vybirat’ knigu (“to choose a book”) the noun is in the accusative case, and in vybor knigi (“the choice of a book”) it is in the genitive case. If the verb is intransitive, the case of the indirect object does not change. For example, in both zhazhdat’ slavy (“to long for glory”) and zhazhda slavy (“a longing for glory”) the noun is in the genitive case. Government of an indirect object may occur without a preposition, as in bolet’ grippom (“to be ill with [by means of] influenza”), or with a preposition, as in bolet’ za komandu (“to be a fan of the team”).

Government may also be strong or loose. In strong government the choice of the preposition and of the case of the governed part is strictly restricted. For example, zaviset’ ot (“to depend on”) must be followed by the genitive case. Loose government permits a freer choice of combinations of the governing part with different forms of the subordinate part. For example, govorit’s (“to speak with”) is followed by a noun in the instrumental case, and govorit’ o (“to speak about”) is followed by a noun in the prepositional case.

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