Angelena Iglesia

Coronavirus: Gateshead testing plan ‘held up by government’

Related Topics
  • Coronavirus pandemic

A medical worker swabs a motorist at a testing centre

image copyrightPA Media

image captionThe government said it was increasing the number of mobile testing centres

Health chiefs in an area battling a Covid-19 spike say they are unable to carry out up to 30,000 tests per day while they wait for government action.

Gateshead was

among several places in the North East added to Public Health England’s watchlist of areas needing “enhanced support” last week.

The council said an empty pathology lab could be used to house extra resources.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said the government was “increasing the testing coming into the area”.

Gateshead’s director of public health, Alice Wiseman, told BBC Radio 4’s World at One “people are having great difficulty getting a test”.

“We’re up to 70 cases per 100,000 so it’s a significant increase. With not everyone able to

Read More

Lawyer for Republicans argues that Johnson County auditor didn’t have discretion to disobey state directive regarding absentee ballot forms

IOWA CITY — A lawyer, arguing for President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign and the Republican National Committee, said Johnson County Auditor Travis Weipert didn’t have discretion to send out prefilled absentee ballot request forms for the Nov. 3 general election.

The prefilled forms — also mailed in Linn and Woodbury counties — did not follow the emergency directive sent to county auditors by Iowa Secretary of State Paul Pate, who is the state commissioner of elections, lawyer Alan Ostergren argued Wednesday in Johnson County District Court. .

Ostergren said Pate consulted with the 20-member Legislative Council, which approved his emergency directive to county auditors, saying they only could mail out blank absentee ballot request forms to maintain uniformity,

Pate, he said, did that after determining not every county had the financial and technical capacity to send out the prefilled forms.

The final approval of the directive by the council was

Read More

Human Rights at Home Blog

Does anyone really read the Democrat and Republican Party Platforms? This year, the Republican Party apparently decided that it wasn’t even worth the time required to update their 2016 document for the 2020 election — they simply re-adopted it wholesale. Still, Professor Marjorie Hershey argues that they signal who has power within the party, and may accurately predict what to expect in the next four years from the successful candidate.

So where do human rights sit within the two platforms for this year’s election?  Here’s a simple analysis based just on a word search for the terms “human rights.”

The Democrat Party Platform uses the term “human rights” twenty-one times.  Often, the term appears in reference to foreign policy and efforts through diplomacy or trade deals to promote human rights.  Here are some examples:

    “We will stand up to the forces of authoritarianism, not aid and abet their rise, and

Read More

Opinion | 7 ways Trump and his cabal are using government to corrupt the election

Quick: What do all these things have in common?

The answer: In all these cases, Trump isn’t just stating claims. He and his cronies are also corruptly manipulating the levers of your government to make them into truths, or inflate them into issues that will garner news coverage that helps him in some way, or both.

Because the crush of governmental manipulation to serve Trump’s personal and political ends is so relentless, we often focus only on isolated examples as they skate past.

But we need to connect the dots. Taken together, they tell a larger story that is truly staggering in its levels of corruption:

Rushing coronavirus treatments. The New York Times just reported that scientists inside Trump’s own government are warning that the White House is laying the groundwork to increase pressure to approve a vaccine before Election Day, “even in the absence of agreement on its effectiveness

Read More

Humane Society fares well despite COVID-19

Larry Savage
 
| The Gainesville Sun

There is something about having a pet that helps brighten a day, relieves stress and brings love to a family. 

At the Humane Society of North Central Florida, the adoptions are at 90% of where they would ordinarily be in a non-pandemic environment. An impressive rate considering how COVID-19 has made life more challenging.

But make no mistake, area residents love their dogs, cats, puppies and kittens.

“We have been presently surprised by how many adoptions we have been able to do,” said Margot DeConna, director of advancement at the Humane Society of North Florida. “Since March 16, when our shelter closed for two months, we have done 1,000 adoptions.”

Those interested in adopting cannot just go to the Humane Society on Northwest Sixth Street and pick their dog or cat. First, go to the Humane Society of North Central Florida’s website and choose

Read More

Even After Years Of Brutal War, The Allies Were Not Prepared For Buchenwald’s Horrors

When Adolf Hitler became chancellor of Germany on January 30, 1933, the world changed forever.

Not only was Hitler determined to pay back Germany’s enemies for his country’s defeat during the Great War, but he was also determined to rid Germany and the rest of Europe of persons whom his twisted Aryan ideology believed were “inferior” or “subhuman.”

Almost immediately upon assuming power, Hitler and his minions began instituting a policy of imprisoning personal and political opponents in special holding centers known as Konzentrazionlagern—concentration camps, or “KL” for short.

At first, abandoned factories, warehouses, and even castles were used to incarcerate the Nazis’ enemies—Communists, Social Democrats, dissidents, and anyone who dared to speak out against the government and its policies. Soon others were added to the list of prisoners—outspoken priests and pastors, men guilty of shirking work, even vagrants. The camps initially were to be “re-education centers,” where those

Read More

Law Society Gets Court Order To Trace Missing Client Funds

Law360, London (September 4, 2020, 4:31 PM BST) — The Law Society won a court order on Friday that will ensure the assets of a company it claims was involved in a “pyramid” scheme using client funds from a now shut-down law firm will remain frozen.

The High Court order requires records to be handed to the Solicitors Regulation Authority as it investigates possible misconduct by a law firm. (AP Photo/Sang Tan) Judge Timothy Fancourt signed an order at the High Court extending a freezing order against Kash2 Ltd. The order also requires the company to hand over records that should help the Solicitors Regulation Authority’s investigations into possible professional…

Stay ahead of the curve

In the legal profession, information is the key to success. You have to know what’s happening with clients, competitors, practice areas, and industries. Law360 provides the intelligence you need to remain an expert and beat

Read More

International law is a ‘political construct’ and breaking it is ‘routine’, Tory MP says



Theresa Villiers sitting on a bench


© Provided by The Independent


A Conservative MP has defended the government’s intention to break international law by claiming that countries violate it on a “routine” basis.

Theresa Villiers, one of Boris Johnson’s former cabinet ministers, argued that it was “not unusual” for countries to disregard the rules and said such laws were merely a “set of political constructs”.

MPs on Monday are debating the Internal Market Bill, which includes provisions that violate the Brexit withdrawal agreement signed by Boris Johnson last year.

Senior figures such as John Major, Theresa May and Tony Blair have warned against the plan, saying it will undermine the UK’s standing in the world and make it harder to criticise other countries that violate international law.

But, taking to the TV studios to defend the government’s actions, Ms Villiers argued: “The reality is that there are routine occasions where countries or indeed the EU are

Read More

George Bizos, human rights lawyer who fought apartheid in South Africa, dies at 92

George Bizos, a workhorse attorney who campaigned against apartheid in South Africa and defended his lifelong friend Nelson Mandela in court, died in Johannesburg on Wednesday. He was 92.



a close up of a man: George Bizos, a family friend of the late former President Nelson Mandela, listens to speeches during the memorial service for Ahmed Kathrada, at the Nelson Mandela Foundation in Johannesburg, South Africa, Tuesday, March 28, 2017. Anti-apartheid activist Ahmed Kathrada, who spent 26 years in jail - many of them alongside Nelson Mandela - for working to end South Africa's previous white minority rule, died in Johannesburg on Tuesday morning. He was 87 years old.


© Themba Hadebe
George Bizos, a family friend of the late former President Nelson Mandela, listens to speeches during the memorial service for Ahmed Kathrada, at the Nelson Mandela Foundation in Johannesburg, South Africa, Tuesday, March 28, 2017. Anti-apartheid activist Ahmed Kathrada, who spent 26 years in jail – many of them alongside Nelson Mandela – for working to end South Africa’s previous white minority rule, died in Johannesburg on Tuesday morning. He was 87 years old.

Bizos died of natural causes around 5:20 p.m. local time at his home, said Luzuko Koti, a spokesperson for the Nelson Mandela Foundation. The human rights lawyer was surrounded by his family at the time of his death, Koti told the Daily News.

Read More

Human rights group finds violations by federal law enforcement in Portland

A team of experts with Physicians for Human Rights, a New York-based group that documents rights violations, spent seven days in Portland investigating the use of crowd control weapons against protesters and law enforcement violence directed at volunteer medical staff.

That team released its findings Tuesday ahead of a Senate Judiciary subcommittee hearing in Washington, D.C.

“PHR has concluded that the response by federal agents that it documented in Portland was disproportionate, excessive, and indiscriminate, and deployed in ways that caused severe injury to innocent civilians, including medics,” the report states.

Dr. Michele Heisler, PHR’s medical director, led the team visiting Portland. Heisler said they didn’t see any official EMTs or paramedics at the protests and that medical care was left to volunteers and civil society.

The report cites numerous instances where law enforcement deliberately targeted volunteer medics and their supplies.

“There was the case of OHSU, their tent was

Read More