Goverment

Pelosi, Mnuchin agree to avoid a government shutdown at end of month

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin agreed on Tuesday to avoid a government shutdown at the end of the month by taking up a stopgap government funding bill, according to a person familiar with their Tuesday phone call.



Steven Mnuchin wearing glasses and looking at the camera: Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin testifies before a hearing of the House subcommittee investigating the federal response to the coronavirus crisis on Capitol Hill, Sept. 1, 2020, in Washington.


© Graeme Jennings/Pool via Getty Images
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin testifies before a hearing of the House subcommittee investigating the federal response to the coronavirus crisis on Capitol Hill, Sept. 1, 2020, in Washington.

The informal agreement would stave off a government shutdown after Sept. 30, and avoid entangling the issue with ongoing coronavirus relief negotiations, which have been at a standstill for several weeks.



Nancy Pelosi looking at the camera: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks at a news conference at the Mission Education Center Elementary School, Sept. 2, 2020, in San Francisco.


© Eric Risberg/AP
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks at a news conference at the Mission Education Center Elementary School, Sept. 2, 2020, in San Francisco.

The proposal to fund government at current levels could avoid a shutdown before the November election, and potentially through

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Government shutdown clash looms as White House seeks short-term government funding bill

The White House is seeking a short-term bill to avert a government shutdown and punt the fight until soon after the November elections, according to a proposal sent to Capitol Hill, setting up a potential clash with Democrats ahead of high-stakes negotiations this month.



a large building with United States Capitol in the background


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Both sides need to reach a deal to avoid a shutdown by the end of September. But the matter is complicated because the two sides are stuck in a bitter impasse over stimulus legislation to prop up the flagging economy amid the coronavirus pandemic. The two issues — keeping the government open past Sept. 30 and providing relief to struggling Americans — are bound to collide just weeks before a hugely consequential election.

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On a 36-minute call on Tuesday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi agreed that they want to avoid a government shutdown

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Deal reached to fund U.S. government past month’s end, Pence says

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Vice President Mike Pence delivers his acceptance speech as the 2020 Republican vice presidential nominee during an event of the 2020 Republican National Convention held at Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S, August 26, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Trump administration has reached a deal with lawmakers in Congress to ensure the U.S. government is funded past Sept. 30, U.S. Vice President Mike Pence said on Friday, removing the threat of a near-term government shutdown.

Pence told CNBC the agreement reached this week by the Republican administration would keep the government funded when the fiscal year runs out at the end of the month and clear the way to focus on another coronavirus relief bill.

A Democratic aide in the U.S. House of Representatives said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin agreed this week to keep any stopgap funding bill free of

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Wisconsin business owner on damage to business, government’s handling of protests

The Week

Federal agents reportedly killed Portland shooting suspect Michael Reinoehl

Federal agents shot and killed Michael Reinoehl, the main suspect in the fatal shooting of a member of a far-right group on Saturday night, while trying to arrest him Thursday, The New York Times and other news organizations report. Portland police had issued a warrant for Reinoehl’s arrest earlier in the day. When officers on a federal fugitive task force tracked him down to an apartment in Lacey, Washington, Reinoehl pulled a gun, a senior Justice Department official told The Associated Press. Witnesses told the Times that Reinoehl was getting into a vehicle to escape.Reinoehl, 48, more or less confessed Thursday to shooting Aaron “Jay” Danielson in a confrontation after supporters of President Trump drove trucks through downtown Portland, but he insisted he was acting in self-defense. “You know, lots of lawyers suggest that I shouldn’t even be saying

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United Airlines to cut 2,850 pilot jobs without more U.S. government aid

United Airlines said on Thursday it will need to cut 2,850 pilot jobs between Oct. 1 and Nov. 30 if the government does not extend an aid package to help airlines cover employee payroll for another six months while they weather the coronavirus pandemic.

The job cuts, released in a memo to employees and shared with the media, would take place between Oct. 1 and Nov. 30 and are significantly higher than those announced earlier this week by rivals Delta Air Lines and American Airlines.

“It’s important to note that our numbers are based on the current travel demand for the remainder of the year and our anticipated flying schedule, which continues to be fluid with the resurgence of COVID-19 in regions across the U.S.,” United said in the memo.

United is more exposed than its peers to international travel, which is expected to take longer to rebound from the

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Government watchdog says Trump action puts Census at further risk

A government watchdog said Thursday that it already considers the 2020 Census to be at high risk for problems, as the data collection endeavor faces a looming deadline next month.



a close up of food


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In a new report, the Government Accountability Office says that the administration’s decision to cut short the counting period puts it at greater risk of producing an inaccurate count, noting that the agency has designated the 2020 Census to be “high risk” since 2017.

“Delays, the resulting compressed timeframes, implementation of untested procedures, and continuing challenges such as COVID-19 could escalate census costs and undermine the overall quality of the count,” the agency wrote.

The Census Bureau told CNN in a statement Friday that it had a completion rate of 79.2% for the 2020 census and its goal remains “a complete and accurate census that produces high quality data.”

“We appreciate GAO’s on-going efforts to keep

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‘Heartwrenching’: at least 40 dolphins dead near Mauritius oil spill

(Reuters) – At least 40 dolphins have mysteriously died in an area of Mauritius affected by an oil spill from a Japanese boat, officials and witnesses said on Friday, as witnesses described the deaths of one mother dolphin and her baby.

Environmentalists have demanded an investigation into whether the dolphins were killed as a result of the spill from a Japanese ship, which was scuttled on Monday after running aground in July and leaking oil.

The death toll may rise: fisherman Yasfeer Heenaye said he saw between 25 and 30 apparently dead dolphins floating in the lagoon on Friday morning, among scores of the animals that fishermen were trying to herd away from the pollution.

“There was a mother and her baby,” he said. “He was very tired, he didn’t swim well. But the mum stayed alongside him, she didn’t leave her baby to go with the group. All the

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Trump pandemic border policy sends asylum seekers back to Ortega’s Nicaragua

Valeska Alemán, 22, paid a price for that notoriety. She was detained twice. Interrogators pried off her toenails. When she decided to leave the country, the United States seemed a natural destination: The Trump administration has been vocal in its opposition to Nicaragua’s crackdown — and its support of the country’s young protesters.

But by the time Alemán arrived at the U.S. border in July, the administration had launched a pandemic-era policy that sends Nicaraguans directly back to their country without letting them apply for asylum. Seventeen days after crossing into Texas, she was put on a plane back to Managua with more than 100 other Nicaraguans, almost all of them opponents of President Daniel Ortega.

Her backpack was full of documents to show U.S. immigration officials that the government appeared ready to kill her. The officials wouldn’t look at them. When she landed back in Nicaragua, it felt as

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Splaining How Government Works to Young Voters

Name: Ben Sheehan

Age: 35

Hometown: Washington, D.C.

Now Lives: In a two-bedroom condo in the Hancock Park section of Los Angeles, with his fiancée, Jackie, and his dog, Chooch.

Claim to Fame: Until 2016 Mr. Sheehan was the head of talent for the humor site Funny Or Die, in charge of concocting outrageous skits with celebrities, like when Michael Bolton starred as himself in a spoof screen test for “Office Space.” Now he’s using humor for civic education. His nonprofit, O.M.G. W.T.F. (it stands for “Ohio, Michigan, Georgia, Wisconsin, Texas, Florida”), explains how the government works to millennials and Gen Z-ers — “a.k.a., the people who have been deprived of civic education these last 20 years,” Mr. Sheehan said.

Big Break: In 2013, when he was a consultant for Funny or Die, charged with getting more musicians on the site, he ran into Scooter Braun, Justin Bieber’s manager, at

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Nobody denies Johnson’s government is incompetent. But do enough voters care? | UK news

This government is a shambles. More and more people say so: not just Keir Starmer but Tory backbenchers, not just Piers Morgan but the Financial Times, not just leftists on Twitter but the Daily Mail. The list of Boris Johnson’s failures – over coronavirus and in just about every other policy area – gets longer every week. Ministers are objects of mockery and contempt.

Government incompetence matters, especially during a pandemic. But it’s also an easy charge to make – almost too easy. It comes naturally to disillusioned voters, who don’t trust politicians anyway; to civil servants, with scores to settle after government cuts; and to journalists, who enjoy judging the powerful and describing Whitehall meltdowns.

Accusing Boris Johnson’s government of ineptness suits a broad range of political interests, too. All those inside and outside his party who warned for years that he would make a disastrous premier can

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