Degrees

Law Degrees: Courses Structure, Specializations & Career

What is law?

It may seem obvious, but what is law? Law, or legal studies, comes into contact with almost every area of human life, touching upon issues relating to business, economics, politics, the environment, human rights, international relations and trade. It is telling that the first academic degrees developed were all related to law. As a law student, you can expect to learn how to tackle some of the most problematic – indeed, often seemingly irresolvable – conflicts and issues in modern society and morality. In providing a framework through which to examine and understand different societies and cultures, law degrees are a useful way to prepare not only for specific legal careers, but for a broad range of professional roles – and indeed, for life in general.

Types of law degrees

There are lots of different types of law degrees available, varying according to where you study.

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Different Types of Law Degrees

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), becoming a lawyer requires a minimum of two degrees over the course of 7 years of full-time study – 4 years for an undergraduate degree, followed by a 3 year law degree earned from a law school accredited by the ABA.

If you are considering law school, generally there are three different types of law degrees a person can earn in the U.S.A. These degrees include a Juris Doctor, a Master of Laws, and a Doctor of Juridical Science.

Juris Doctor

The Juris Doctor allows a person to practice law within the United States of America. This is the first law degree that a person becoming an attorney will earn. A Juris Doctor takes three full years to complete and is started after a person has earned a bachelor’s degree from a college. There are some Juris Doctor degrees that can be

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