Tag: History

The History Teacher, published by the Society for History Education


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NGS Family History Conference |

Learn new strategies, resources, and techniques to sharpen your family history skills at the NGS 2020 Family History Conference.

The upcoming NGS 2020 Family History Conference will be held in Salt Lake City, Utah, and will offer the best and most expansive series of lectures to advance your research. Salt Lake City is easily accessible and has some of the best genealogical research resources in the US.

The NGS Family History Conference, 20–23 May 2020 is your opportunity to choose from more than 175 lectures presented by many nationally recognized speakers, explore an exhibit hall filled with more than 80 exhibitors, and network with more than 2,000 genealogists. Every NGS conference has a different theme with a new program top to bottom—so there is always more to learn and discover. Registration is now open.

 

The echoes of our ancestors resonate within us. Their voices, beliefs, cultures, choices, experiences, and traditions

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Red vs. Blue: A history of how we use political colors

Then, later in the broadcast, the team shows the current map of who’s winning which state. And that, too, is jarring.

The Democrats are blue and the Republicans are … yellow? Why aren’t they red? The answer is: Because the assignation of red-as-Republican, blue-as-Democrat didn’t become the standard until the last election of the third century in which America existed: the election of 2000.

There have been a number of good assessments of how the way in which we depict the two parties has evolved. One of the earliest appeared here in the Post, shortly before the 2004 election. There was one shortly after that in Washington Monthly which is often cited; probably the most thorough is this one, from the Smithsonian.

What’s clear is that, prior to 2000, talking about “red states” and “blue states” wouldn’t necessarily have resulted in any understanding from your audience. In 1992, David Nyhan

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Cuban Americans – History, Slavery, Revolution, Modern era, Significant immigration waves

Overview

Cuba is an island nation located on the northern rim of the Caribbean Sea.
It is the largest of the Greater Antilles islands. To Cuba’s east
is the island of Hispaniola, shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic.
Off the southeastern coast of Cuba lies Jamaica, and to the north is the
state of Florida. In 1992 Cuba had an estimated population of nearly 11
million. Since 1959, Cuba has been led by President Fidel Castro, whose
socialist revolution overthrew dictator Fulgencio Batista. In the years
before the breakup of the Soviet Union, Cuba maintained a close political
and economic relationship with that nation. Cuba has had a distant and
antagonistic relationship with the United States. Sugar is the principal
export of Cuba, but the Cuban economy, by most accounts, is weak.

The Cuban people are descendants of Spanish colonizers and of

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The Government Shutdown Was the Longest Ever. Here’s the History.

The longest shutdown in American history ended on Friday, after 34 full days. That easily exceeded the previous record, under President Bill Clinton in 1995, of 21 days.

In total, there have been 21 gaps in government funding since 1976, though the level of shutdown has varied. The current federal shutdown is a partial one, as many agencies were already funded through this fiscal year, which ends in September.





The History Teacher

(ISSN: 0018-2745)

is a peer-reviewed

quarterly journal.

THT publishes inspirational scholarship on traditional and unconventional techniques
in history education.

Volume 52 (2018-2019)
is delivered internationally
in print to members of the
non-profit organization, the
Society for History Education.




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Volume 52, No. 4: (August 2019)

Volume 52, No. 4
August 2019






The History Teacher

DEC. 22, 2018

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Great Society – HISTORY

Contents

  1. Riding A Wave of Empathy
  2. War On Poverty
  3. Medicare and Medicaid
  4. Head Start and Education Reform
  5. Urban Renewal
  6. Support for Arts and Humanities
  7. Environmental Initiatives
  8. The Great Society Backlash and Vietnam
  9. Sources

The Great Society was an ambitious series of policy initiatives, legislation and programs spearheaded by President Lyndon B. Johnson with the main goals of ending poverty, reducing crime, abolishing inequality and improving the environment. In May 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson laid out his agenda for a “Great Society” during a speech at the University of Michigan. With his eye on re-election that year, Johnson set in motion his Great Society, the largest social reform plan in modern history.

Riding A Wave of Empathy

On November 22, 1963, Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in as President of the United States after the killing of John F. Kennedy.

The assassination of Kennedy left American citizens reeling. They felt

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Three Branches of Government – HISTORY

Contents

  1. Separation of Powers
  2. Legislative Branch
  3. Executive Branch
  4. Judicial Branch
  5. Implied Powers of the Three Branches of Government
  6. Checks and Balances
  7. Sources

The three branches of the U.S. government are the legislative, executive and judicial branches. According to the doctrine of separation of powers, the U.S. Constitution distributed the power of the federal government among these three branches, and built a system of checks and balances to ensure that no one branch could become too powerful.

Separation of Powers

The Enlightenment philosopher Montesquieu coined the phrase “trias politica,” or separation of powers, in his influential 18th-century work “Spirit of the Laws.” His concept of a government divided into legislative, executive and judicial branches acting independently of each other inspired the framers of the U.S. Constitution, who vehemently opposed concentrating too much power in any one body of government.

In the Federalist Papers, James Madison wrote of the necessity of the

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Honduras Facts and Figures, Honduras History, Political, Banking, Education, Lifestyle











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LOCATION

Honduras is approximately 1000 miles southwest of Miami and has a mainly mountainous area of 48,200 square miles. To the North it has a large coastal line with the Caribbean sea and to the South it enjoys a small access to the Pacific.
Tegucigalpa, the capital of Honduras, got its tongue twisting name from the ancient Nahuatl language, and translated means “silver mountain” In effect, Tegucigalpa came to being during colonial times as a mining center. “Tegus” as its inhabitants affectionately call it, is a mix of an old colonial city that has turned into the modern capital of Honduras.
San Pedro Sula is called the industrial capital of Honduras. 80% of all industrial parks are within 20 miles of the city.
The coastal city of Ceiba and El Progresso are the third

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Longest government shutdown, day 35: 2019 record, longest in history

  • The government shutdown is now in its 35th day, far surpassing the record for the longest of the modern era.
  • This is the 21st time the federal government has had a funding lapse since the modern budgeting process began.
  • Most of those times, the shutdown has been short and not involved employees being sent home, but that has changed in recent years.

President Donald Trump and Democratic leaders have yet to come to an agreement to reopen the government, pushing the government shutdown into a historic 35th day.

No previous shutdown had lasted past a 21st day, with the 1995-1996 shutdown as the previous standard-bearer. But the current, drawn-out shutdown fight has eclipsed the record and shows no signs of ending.

The trouble started just before Christmas when Trump’s sudden reversal on a bipartisan funding extension forced a sizeable portion — but not all — of the government into a

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History of the Royal Society

The story of the Royal Society is the story of modern science.

Our origins lie in a 1660 ‘invisible college’ of natural philosophers and physicians. Today we are the UK’s national science academy and a Fellowship of some 1,600 of the world’s most eminent scientists.

Nullius in verba

The very first ‘learned society’ meeting on 28 November 1660 followed a lecture at Gresham College by Christopher Wren. Joined by other leading polymaths including Robert Boyle and John Wilkins, the group soon received royal approval, and from 1663 it would be known as ‘The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge’.

The Royal Society’s motto ‘Nullius in verba’ is taken to mean ‘take nobody’s word for it’. It is an expression of the determination of Fellows to withstand the domination of authority and to verify all statements by an appeal to facts determined by experiment.

Advancements and adventure

The early

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