Policy

Apple publishes human rights policy, commits to freedom of information

Apple on Friday published a document detailing its human rights policy and committing to “freedom of information and expression,” among other things.



a sign on the side of a building: Apple publishes human rights policy, commits to freedom of information


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Apple publishes human rights policy, commits to freedom of information

“With humility, optimism, and an abiding faith in people, we’re committed to respecting the human rights of everyone whose lives we touch,” the four-page document reads.

At its February annual general meeting a shareholder proposal calling on Apple to publicly commit “to respect freedom of expression as a human right” received more than 40 percent support from shareholders.

According to The Financial Times, Apple’s board of directors approved the policy and published it ahead of a deadline of Sept. 5 for shareholders to submit motions for next year’s investor meeting.

“We believe in the critical importance of an open society in which information flows freely, and we’re convinced the best way we can

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Trump pandemic border policy sends asylum seekers back to Ortega’s Nicaragua

Valeska Alemán, 22, paid a price for that notoriety. She was detained twice. Interrogators pried off her toenails. When she decided to leave the country, the United States seemed a natural destination: The Trump administration has been vocal in its opposition to Nicaragua’s crackdown — and its support of the country’s young protesters.

But by the time Alemán arrived at the U.S. border in July, the administration had launched a pandemic-era policy that sends Nicaraguans directly back to their country without letting them apply for asylum. Seventeen days after crossing into Texas, she was put on a plane back to Managua with more than 100 other Nicaraguans, almost all of them opponents of President Daniel Ortega.

Her backpack was full of documents to show U.S. immigration officials that the government appeared ready to kill her. The officials wouldn’t look at them. When she landed back in Nicaragua, it felt as

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Politics, Policy, Political News – POLITICO

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Politics & Policy – The Atlantic

David A. Graham

Pollsters have finally found an issue that transcends partisan divides, with the overwhelming majority of Americans siding against President Trump.

The complaint that Washington is out of step with Main Street has been circulating for roughly as long as each metonym has been in use. But it’s seldom, if ever, been more true than at this moment in the coronavirus pandemic.

The most active debate in politics at the moment—in the White House, in state capitols, and in the press—is about whether and how much to reopen the economy. President Trump has been fitfully pushing for the country to get back to work, has boosted fringe state-level protests demanding that restrictions end, and yesterday took his first trip in weeks, visiting a mask-manufacturing plant in Arizona.

But even as the national political discourse has adopted reopening as the central debate, polls repeatedly show that Americans overwhelmingly back

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Government & Policy | Healthcare IT News

The UK government has released a statement in conjunction with many key players in the telecoms industry to announce their elevated support during the COVID-19 crisis. 

Physicians are now allowed to care for patients at rural hospitals “via phone, radio or online communication, without having to be physically present.”

Homeless people.

In HIMSS20 Digital, health informatics expert Brian Dixon links the power of health information exchange networks to actionable data for hospitals.

Eligible organizations would get full funding for approved services and devices “necessary to provide critical connected care” until funds are exhausted or until the pandemic has subsided.

While work at Mann-Grandstaff is 99% complete, right now the department’s priority is the “care of veterans and providing surge capabilities for civilian health care systems.”

This ONC map shows the locations of ongoing Interoperability Proving Ground projects focused on COVID-19 response.

The agency’s Interoperability Proving Ground is becoming a hotbed of coronavirus

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The Health Law & Policy Institute (HLPI)

The Health Law & Policy Institute (HLPI) at the University of Houston Law Center is home to one of the nation’s leading health law programs. We have been consistently ranked as a top 10 program U.S. News and World Report for over two decades. HLPI has been at the forefront of legal education, scholarship, and policy analysis for over forty years. Formed in 1978, HLPI has built a diverse portfolio of research on a variety of topics, including health finance systems; disability law; health information exchange; genetic data; health care quality and access improvement; integrated provider organizations; and questions of individual rights in health care and biomedical research.

We provide our students with a rigorous, comprehensive, and cutting-edge education in health law at the basic (J.D.) and advanced (LL.M.) levels to prepare them for careers in health law practice, policy, and academia. Faculty at HLPI conduct independent and grant-funded research

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Policy and Politics Journal

KonigPascal D. König & Markus B. Siewert

A key promise of representative democracy is that the government strives to generate public policy outputs which are responsive to the preferences of (a majority of) the people. If it delivers on its policy promises, a government can expect to gain or maintain support in the electorate, but if it fails to do so, it is likely to be sanctioned at the next election. This amounts to a central – albeit perhaps somewhat romanticising – rationale behind political competition driving policymakers to do their job.  Continue reading Claiming and Assigning Credit for Fulfilled Policy Promises – Why Policymakers Fight an Uphill Battle

LSERuth Dixon and Thomas Elston

Over 97 per cent of English local authorities cooperate with one another, providing common public services across separate council areas. Ruth Dixon and Thomas Elston consider how and why this occurs.

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