Tag: Wiktionary

government – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (nonstandard eye dialect) gub’mint, gubmint, gummint, gubbamint, guvmint, guvment, gumment, guv’ment, guv’mint, gubbermint, gubment, gub’ment, govermint, guvverment, guvvermint, guverment, guvermint

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English governement, from Old French governement (modern French gouvernement), from governer (see govern) + -ment.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

government (countable and uncountable, plural governments)

  1. The body with the power to make and/or enforce laws to control a country, land area, people or organization.
    • 2013 July 6, “The rise of smart beta”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8843, page 68:

      Investors face a quandary. Cash offers a return of virtually zero in many developed countries; government-bond yields may have risen in recent weeks

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sister-in-law – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English suster-in-lawe; equivalent to sister +‎ in +‎ law.

Noun[edit]

sister-in-law (plural sisters-in-law)

  1. A female relative of one’s generation, separated by one degree of marriage:
    1. The sister of one’s spouse.
    2. The wife of one’s sibling.
  2. (less common) Co-sister-in-law: The wife of one’s sibling-in-law.
    1. The wife of the sibling of one’s spouse.
    2. The sister of the spouse of one’s sibling.

Usage notes[edit]

The plural sister-in-laws is occasionally seen, especially in American English, but this is considered incorrect by most sources; see, for example, [1].

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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politics – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the adjective politic, by analogy with Aristotle’s τα πολιτικά (ta politiká, affairs of state).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

politics (countable and uncountable, plural politics)

  1. (countable) A methodology and activities associated with running a government, an organization, or a movement.
    • 1996, Jan Jindy Pettman, Worlding Women: A feminist international politics, pages ix-x:
      There are by now many feminisms (Tong, 1989; Humm, 1992). […] They are in shifting alliance or contest with postmodern critiques, which at times seem to threaten the very category ‘women’ and its possibilities for a feminist politics.
  2. (countable) The profession of conducting political affairs.

    He made a career out of politics.

  3. (plural) One’s political stands and opinions.

    Their politics are clear from the bumper stickers

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politic – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French politique, from Latin politicus, from Ancient Greek πολιτικός (politikós), from πολίτης (polítēs, citizen). Cognate with German politisch (political).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

politic (comparative more politic, superlative most politic)

  1. (archaic) Of or relating to polity, or civil government; political.
    the body politic
    • 1593, Sir Philip Sidney, The Countesse of Pembrokes Arcadia:

      [] he with his people made all but one politic body whereof himself was the head

  2. (archaic, of things) Relating to, or promoting, a policy, especially a national policy; well-devised; adapted to its end, whether right or wrong.
    a politic treaty
  3. (archaic) Sagacious in promoting a policy; ingenious in
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