Years

Even After Years Of Brutal War, The Allies Were Not Prepared For Buchenwald’s Horrors

When Adolf Hitler became chancellor of Germany on January 30, 1933, the world changed forever.

Not only was Hitler determined to pay back Germany’s enemies for his country’s defeat during the Great War, but he was also determined to rid Germany and the rest of Europe of persons whom his twisted Aryan ideology believed were “inferior” or “subhuman.”

Almost immediately upon assuming power, Hitler and his minions began instituting a policy of imprisoning personal and political opponents in special holding centers known as Konzentrazionlagern—concentration camps, or “KL” for short.

At first, abandoned factories, warehouses, and even castles were used to incarcerate the Nazis’ enemies—Communists, Social Democrats, dissidents, and anyone who dared to speak out against the government and its policies. Soon others were added to the list of prisoners—outspoken priests and pastors, men guilty of shirking work, even vagrants. The camps initially were to be “re-education centers,” where those

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Six examples of government waste from this year’s budget-hawk reports

Citizens Against Government Waste released its annual “Prime Cuts” report this month, recommending programs that the government could eliminate for some $648 billion in savings next year.

The group has conservative roots, but its recommendations affect a wide variety of programs, from farm aid and defense spending to AmeriCorps and community-development grants.

Also this month, Rep. Steve Russell (R-Okla.) released the first edition of “Waste Watch,” following in the footsteps of former Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.), who published an annual “Waste Book” for years before retiring in January.

Below are six examples of alleged waste from this year’s budget-hawk analyses:

Dairy, peanut, and sugar subsidies

The “Prime Cuts” report calls for an end to subsidies that assist dairy, peanut and sugar farmers and help control prices for those products. It says the government could save $2.85 billion combined in one year by eliminating the programs.

Citizens Against Government Waste compared

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SVDP USA | Providing Assistance to Those in Need for Over 150 Years > Home

 The Society of St. Vincent de Paul 

Response to COVID-19

For 175 years, the Society of St. Vincent de Paul has offered person-to-person services to the most vulnerable in communities throughout the United States. In 2018, The Society’s nearly 100,000 trained volunteers throughout the United States provided 12.5 million hours of volunteer service, helping more than 5.4 million people. 

Around the country, we are adapting our daily work to practice social distancing, as directed by federal and state agencies. In these unprecedented times, SVdP is shifting our service model from personalized face-to-face service to meeting basic needs while social distancing… to protect the health of our volunteers, staff, friends in need, and communities. We are tailoring our services to meet the unique needs of all the communities we serve.

We are accustomed to working with vulnerable populations. Like other businesses and organizations, our local groups have adopted protocols for preventing

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New Year’s resolution: Let’s exercise our body politic

The New Year is a time of reflection and renewal. We look back on the past year — or in this case, the past decade — and we make resolutions for the year ahead.

What if our collective New Year’s resolution this year was not your traditional “go to the gym more,” but, rather, exercising the whole body politic? What would that workout plan look like?

Democracy is like a muscle. The more we exercise it, the stronger it gets. The more people engage in civil society, the more representative, responsive, and productive our society becomes. Like healthy muscles, a healthy democracy tends to have benefits too — better civil rights protections, a stronger social safety net, and a legal system that works for the many, not just the few.

Having lived in parts of the world where civil society is weak, I appreciate the extraordinary power that ordinary people

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