Coronavirus

Global coronavirus cases see record daily rise as world leaders slammed for sparking Covid ‘world disorder’



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A collective failure by world leaders to heed warnings and prepare for the coronavirus pandemic has transformed “a world at risk” to a “world in disorder”, a damning new report claims.

The review by the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board (GPMB) was published just hours after the World Health Organisation reported a record one-day increase in global Covid-19 cases.

The total number of infections rose by 307,930 in just 24 hours on Sunday. Deaths rose by 5,537 to a total of 917,417.

The GPMB said “we are all paying the price” for a lack of financial and political investment in preparedness by heads of state.

“It is not as if the world has lacked the opportunity to take these steps,” it said.

“There have been numerous calls for action over the last decade, yet none has generated the changes needed.”

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Coronavirus in numbers: UK death

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Netflix Cancels ‘The Society’ Due To The Coronavirus

As a global pandemic rages, it often feels like we’re in a dystopian parallel universe, and wouldn’t it be nice to try to get back to our original timeline where everything is okay. On Netflix’s The Society, that’s exactly what the characters are dealing with. In the series, a group of teens one day find themselves displaced from their town of West Ham, Connecticut, into a parallel town that looks exactly the same, but everyone else is gone, and the town is cut off from the rest of the world by wilderness. Season 1 saw the teens try to create their own society, dubbed as New Ham, with a government, and laws, in a very Lord of the Flies-inspired fashion.

After season 1 dropped in May 2019, Netflix renewed the popular series in July 2019, but when the series was supposed to go

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Coronavirus: Gateshead testing plan ‘held up by government’

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  • Coronavirus pandemic

A medical worker swabs a motorist at a testing centre

image copyrightPA Media

image captionThe government said it was increasing the number of mobile testing centres

Health chiefs in an area battling a Covid-19 spike say they are unable to carry out up to 30,000 tests per day while they wait for government action.

Gateshead was

among several places in the North East added to Public Health England’s watchlist of areas needing “enhanced support” last week.

The council said an empty pathology lab could be used to house extra resources.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said the government was “increasing the testing coming into the area”.

Gateshead’s director of public health, Alice Wiseman, told BBC Radio 4’s World at One “people are having great difficulty getting a test”.

“We’re up to 70 cases per 100,000 so it’s a significant increase. With not everyone able to

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Cross-party MPs to sue UK government for details of Covid PPE contracts | Coronavirus outbreak

MPs are to launch legal action to force the government to reveal details of hundreds of personal protective equipment (PPE) contracts, amid mounting complaints over the secrecy around the deals.

A cross-party group of MPs has signed a pre-action letter accusing ministers of breaching transparency rules and demanding the immediate disclosure of the contracts, which are valued at more than £5bn. The legal letter claims: “Publication of the contracts themselves appears not to be happening in relation to Covid-19 contracts on a routine basis.”

The Labour, Lib Dem and Green MPs cite a series of contracts over which concerns have been raised. Details of a contract awarded to Ayanda Capital worth £252m have not been published; the 50m masks it supplied were later deemed unsuitable for use by NHS workers. Details of another £32m contract awarded to Crisp Websites, a pest-control firm trading under the name of PestFix, have also

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5 things to know as L.A. coronavirus mask order becomes law

If you are going to a grocery store, pharmacy or doing other essential shopping in Los Angeles, you need to be wearing a mask or face covering.

Beginning Friday, a new city order requires both shoppers and workers to wear a face covering.

It’s the latest effort by the city to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. The stay-at-home order has already closed nonessential businesses as well as many beaches, trails and recreation centers.

Here are five things to bear in mind:

1. The idea is to protect both customers and workers

California has been under stay-at-home orders for several weeks, and that limits trips to essential business like food shopping, doctor’s appointments and pharmacy trips.

There has been concern about the potential exposure to coronavirus at retailers such as supermarkets. Many markets have limited how many people can enter and tried to impose social distancing measures in lines.

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How Republicans and Democrats Think About Coronavirus

The disparity between the parties was underscored Thursday afternoon when Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and California Governor Gavin Newsom, both Democrats, issued rapid-fire orders closing down all non-essential businesses, first in the city and then in the entire state, a jurisdiction of 39.5 million people.

This divergence reflects not only ideological but also geographic realities. So far, the greatest clusters of the disease, and the most aggressive responses to it, have indeed been centered in a few large, Democratic-leaning metropolitan areas, including Seattle, New York, San Francisco, and Boston. At Thursday’s White House press briefing, Deborah Birx, the administration’s response coordinator, said half of the nation’s cases so far are located in just 10 counties. The outbreak’s eventual political effects may vary significantly depending on how extensively it spreads beyond these initial beachheads.

If the

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Coronavirus Live Updates : NPR

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos says there is “no reason” to waive main parts of the federal special education law.

Alex Brandon/AP


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Alex Brandon/AP

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos says there is “no reason” to waive main parts of the federal special education law.

Alex Brandon/AP

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos will not recommend that Congress waive the main requirements of three federal education laws, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, known as IDEA. The federal law ensures that children with disabilities have a right to a free, appropriate public education whenever and wherever schools are operating.

When Congress passed the coronavirus relief package, known as the CARES Act, they included a provision that allowed the secretary to request waivers to parts of the special education law during the pandemic. The concern was that holding strictly to IDEA and other laws could hinder schools in the urgency

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Law enforcement and politicians clash over coronavirus orders

Despite warnings from health officials that social distancing and the wearing of face coverings can help flatten the statistical curve of nationwide infections, from Texas to Washington state a handful of officers sworn to uphold the law have in recent weeks publicly expressed their opposition to government regulations aimed at keeping citizens from transmitting the virus to others.

The latest high-profile protest by law enforcement came on Wednesday from the head of a Houston police union, who penned an open letter forcefully taking issue with a new order requiring face coverings by anyone in public over 10 years of age, with some exceptions. The order carries a $1,000 fine for noncompliance.

The police union president said that while officers support the public wearing masks, police departments do not have the resources to enforce “draconian” face covering orders. He also took issue with the way he believes such enforcement could negatively

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Government Response to Coronavirus, COVID-19

  • Administration for Children and Families has program information for children, families, and communities.

  • Administration for Community Living offers information for older adults, and people with disabilities.

  • Army Public Health Center guidance for Army members and their families.

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is studying the virus worldwide and helping communities respond locally. Check the CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) page for news and guidance.

  • Centers for Medicare and Medicaid has guidance for Medicare recipients and Medicare providers.

  • Consumer Product Safety Commission offers home safety advice.

  • Corporation for National and Community Service gives guidance for volunteers and programs.

  • Defense Commissary Agency is ensuring the quality and safety of food available at commissaries worldwide.

  • Department of Defense supports the government response and is working to protect the health of the military.

  • Department of Energy is researching COVID-19 at the National Labs.

  • Department of Health and Human Services shares news releases.

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    Coronavirus: Resources & What You Should Know

    The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is closely monitoring the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

    One of our highest priorities is the well-being of our employees, volunteers, donors, partners, and the patients we serve – especially as many blood cancer patients are immunocompromised.

    As a health organization, LLS takes seriously our responsibility to help slow the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) and protect the communities we serve. As such, we are postponing our in-person fundraising events, and postponing in-person events for patients, caregivers and healthcare professionals. LLS remains open for business, although our offices are closed and our staff is working from home. When possible, we will provide virtual opportunities to continue to drive forward our important mission work.

    We are following vigilantly guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the World Health Organization (WHO) and local public health officials as we continue to evaluate our plans and

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