Human

Article: US Is the Top Human Rights Violator in the World, and It’s Not Even Close

Republished from The American Herald Tribune


Few things are more politicized and distorted in the United States than the subject of human rights. Over the last two generations, the U.S. political class and its conduits in the corporate media have weaponized human rights to serve an imperialist agenda. NGOs such as Human Rights Watch (HRW) and Amnesty International tend to focus much of their time crafting human rights narratives on matters of critical importance to the U.S. Department of State. Syria, Nicaragua, Venezuela, and a host of countries have been condemned by these organizations for alleged human rights violations. Since 2018, China has been targeted for the same treatment.

China is accused of detaining millions of Xinjiang-based Uyghurs in “concentration camps.” Thanks to Ajit Singh and The Grayzone, we know that the sources for these allegations are far from reliable. We know that the principle

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Justice Secretary Robert Buckland denies Boris Johnson set to opt out of major human rights laws

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland has denied Boris Johnson is set to opt out of the European Convention on Human Rights.

Mr Buckland said leaving the Convention would be “wholly wrong” and that the UK Government should instead focus on streamlining its domestic laws.

It comes despite reports the Prime Minister is planning to withdraw from major parts of European human rights laws in a bid to ease migrant deportation cases.


But speaking on Sunday, the Justice Secretary batted down these suggestions.

Boris Johnson was said to have been planning to withdraw from major parts of European human rights laws (REUTERS)

The European Convention on Human Rights, a landmark treaty that was drawn up in the aftermath of the Second World War, aims to protect the civil and political rights of the continent’s citizens.

Mr

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European Court of Human Rights’ president degrades court with Turkish award

Because Europe prides itself on institutions that uphold and promote international law, the European Court of Human Rights is perhaps the most popular symbol of the European approach toward statecraft. As the Strasburg-based court was established under the aegis of Council of Europe, its jurisdiction is far broader than even the European Union. Today, 47 states are members, 20 more countries than have joined the European Union.



Recep Tayyip Erdogan wearing a suit and tie


© Provided by Washington Examiner


Alas, as often happens with human rights institutions, ego, arrogance, and an embrace of moral equivalence combines to erode their standing and betray the principles for which they stand. Former Ireland President Mary Robinson, for example, made a mockery of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights when she sponsored the Orwellian “World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance.” A decade ago, Robert Bernstein took to the pages of the New York

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Boris Johnson ‘plans to opt out of human rights laws’ amid Brexit row

Boris Johnson is planning to opt out of parts of the Human Rights Act, according to reports.

The prime minister is said be considering ways to prevent the legislation being used to stop deportations of asylum seekers and prosecutions of British soldiers.

A review of human rights laws has been carried out across Whitehall and its findings will be announced “in the coming weeks”, the Daily Telegraph reported.

The move comes after Mr Johnson sparked fury in Europe with the Internal Market Bill to override part of the Brexit deal he signed in October.

Ministers have admitted that it would break international law but the prime minister claims it is necessary to prevent the EU  “carving up our country”.

However he is facing mounting criticism from across the political spectrum, including rebel Tory MPs and former prime ministers John Major and Tony Blair.

Brussels wants the UK to

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Fury at Boris Johnson’s plan to have ‘opt-outs from human rights laws’

Boris Johnson has sparked fury after it emerged he is plotting “opt-outs” from human rights laws in certain situations after Brexit.

The Prime Minister is looking at changing the law to make it easier to deport migrants or asylum seekers, according to the Sunday Telegraph.

Changing the law could also make it harder to bring legal action against British troops overseas.

The changes would reportedly be made to the Human Rights Act, which was passed in 1998 to apply the European Convention on Human Rights in UK law.

The Convention is a landmark treaty that drawn up after the Second World War which protects freedom from torture, family life, protection from discrimination and the right to a fair trial.

While the Tories today insisted they would not abandon the Convention, they have been vowing to reform the Act since before the general election.

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Personal data transfer and human rights | Feature

Ibrahim hasan

In July, Schrems II (case C-311/18) saw the European Court of Justice rule that the ‘Privacy Shield’ was invalid. This is a framework agreed between the UK and US to allow for the free flow of personal data across the Atlantic in a way which was, at the time, believed to be compliant with EU data protection law. In its ruling the ECJ was concerned about US authorities’ wide-ranging powers to access the personal data of EU residents and the impact on privacy.

In April, part 3 of the Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA) was also involved in a case about the transfer of personal data to the US. Part 3 is similar to GDPR but only regulates the processing of personal data for law enforcement purposes by competent authorities, which include (among others) government departments and the police.

Elgizouli (Appellant) v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Respondent)

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Boris Johnson set to opt out of human rights laws



FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020 file photo, Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson leaves Downing Street to attend the weekly session of Prime Ministers Questions in Parliament in London. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has strongly defended his controversial plan to override sections of the Brexit deal that he negotiated with the European Union, arguing that the bloc has an “extreme” interpretation of the treaty that could jeopardize the future of the U.K. In a column Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020 in The Daily Telegraph, Johnson said the Internal Market Bill is required to end EU threats to impose a “blockade” in the Irish Sea that he argues could “carve up our country.”  (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, file)


© ASSOCIATED PRESS
FILE – In this Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020 file photo, Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson leaves Downing Street to attend the weekly session of Prime Ministers Questions in Parliament in London. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has strongly defended his controversial plan to override sections of the Brexit deal that he negotiated with the European Union, arguing that the bloc has an “extreme” interpretation of the treaty that could jeopardize the future of the U.K. In a column Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020 in The Daily Telegraph, Johnson said the Internal Market Bill is required to end EU threats to impose a “blockade” in the Irish Sea that he argues could “carve up our country.” (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, file)

Britain is preparing to opt out of major parts of European human rights laws, risking an explosive new row with the EU.

Boris Johnson’s aides and ministers are drawing

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Boris Johnson to opt out of major European human rights laws

Boris Johnson looks set to withdraw from significant European human rights laws in a move which could make it easier to deport migrants and more difficult to sue British soldiers. 

Ministers are considering opt-outs from the Human Rights Act (HRA) in areas the Government believes European judges have ‘overreached,’ according to the Sunday Telegraph.

The legislation was signed into British law in November 1998 to incorporate rights set out in the European Convention on Human Rights.   

An opt-out could prevent a significant number of migrants and asylum seekers from using the legislation to avoid deportation from the UK.  

The move could also protect British soldiers from claims against their overseas activities, it was reported.

It is understood details of a formal review will be announced in the coming weeks.

Boris Johnson looks set to opt out of major European human rights laws which could make it easier to deport migrants

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‘Legendary’: Prominent human rights lawyer George Bizos dies | South Africa

George Bizos, the anti-apartheid campaigner and human rights lawyer who defended Nelson Mandela during the decades-long struggle for South Africa’s democracy, has died.

He was 92.

Bizos died “peacefully” at his home in Johannesburg of “natural causes”, his family said late on Wednesday.

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa said the news of Bizos’s death was “very sad for us as a country”.

“An incisive legal mind and architect of our constitution, he contributed immensely to our democracy. We extend our deepest condolences to his family and dip our heads in his honour,” Ramaphosa said.

George Bizos, left, anti-apartheid activist and lifelong friend and lawyer of Nelson Mandela, right, arrives for his 80th birthday party in Johannesburg [File: Denis Farrell/AP Photo]

Fleeing the Nazis

Bizos was born in Vasilitisi, southern Greece, in 1927. He arrived in South Africa in 1941 after he and his father fled the Nazi occupation of Greece

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Boris to opt-out of major European human rights laws making it easier to deport migrants, harder to sue soldiers

Boris to opt-out of major European human rights laws making it easier to deport migrants, harder to sue soldiers

Boris Johnson looks set to withdraw from significant European human rights laws in a move which could make it easier to deport migrants and more difficult to sue British soldiers.

Ministers are considering opt-outs from the Human Rights Act (HRA) in areas the Government believes European judges have ‘overreached,’ according to the Sunday Telegraph.

The legislation was signed into British law in November 1998 to incorporate rights set out in the European Convention on Human Rights.

The Tory manifesto pledged to ‘update’ the HRA after Brexit, but the move is contentious with Brussels and negotiators have expressed concern over the UK’s commitment to the European Convention on Human Rights.

It comes amid a growing crisis over the number of migrants making treacherous journeys across the English Channel from northern France.

An opt-out could prevent a significant number of migrants and asylum seekers from using the legislation to avoid deportation from

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